Foundation News

Open House Sundays

June 12th, 2016

Open House Sundays at The Brant Foundation

1-3pm on the following dates:

June 12th, 19th, 26th
July 10th, 17th
August 28th
September 4th, 11th

On view:

 Jonathan Horowitz: Occupy Greenwich

Parking for The Brant Foundation’s open house Sundays will be located at Greenwich Polo Club. A designated parking area will be on your immediate left before Greenwich Polo check-in. If you wish to stay for the polo match please proceed to Greenwich Polo check-in to purchase a ticket. You may also purchase a discounted ticket online at: greenwichpolo.com.

Please contact us with any questions: 203-869-0611 or info@brantfoundation.org

About Occupy Greenwich:

Opening amid the presidential election season, the exhibition is comprised mostly of work made over the course of Barack Obama’s eight-year presidency. As such, the exhibition presents a timely opportunity to examine Horowitz’s ever-evolving practice within the context of the current political landscape.

Since the early 1990s, Horowitz has created work that combines the imagery and ambivalence of Pop Art with the engaged criticality of conceptualism. His work in video, sculpture, painting and photography examines the deep-seated links between consumerism and political consciousness, as well as the political silences of postwar art. Recent painting projects have explored the personal psychology of mark making, at times prominently employing the hands of others. Appropriation of both pop cultural and art historical sources figures heavily in the show, with imagery transformed through both technology and the human hand.

Anchoring the exhibition is the installation November 4, 2008, which re-stages the day eight years ago when Obama was elected president. In the piece, 19 hours of CNN and Fox News coverage (originally presented as live feeds) play on back-to-back monitors in the center of a room. Red and blue carpets divide the space into opposing sides and 42 official presidential portraits circle the room, with Obama’s portrait in waiting on the floor.

Upon arrival at the Foundation, viewers are confronted by a functional solar panel sculpture on the lawn, which powers Horowitz’s video Apocalypto Now inside. Using found footage, the film weaves narratives on the history of the Hollywood disaster movie, climate change, terrorism, and the Christian apocalypse. In another room, a human scale, bronze statue of Hillary Clinton greets visitors. Rendered in the style of a 1970’s greeting card figurine, the sculpture is captioned “Hillary Clinton is a Person Too,” evoking Clinton’s vilification as both a political leader and a powerful woman.

Notwithstanding its political undertones, viewer participation and social interaction are recurring tenets of Horowitz’s work. A sculptural installation titled Free Store invites viewers to leave objects that they wish to discard and take away whatever they would like. Another work, Contribution Cubes, is a series of Plexiglas donation boxes each dedicated to a different charitable or political organization. Suggesting minimalist sculpture and relational aesthetics, the work describes the population that passes through the exhibition space through the varying donation amounts that accumulate. 402 Dots, the first of Horowitz’s Dot Paintings, is a monumentally scaled work comprised of 402 canvases, each painted by a different person. Participants in the project were instructed to paint a perfect, solid black dot with an 8-inch diameter in the center of a 12-inch square canvas, using only provided paint and brushes. The resulting dots all differ in size, shape, position, and texture. The paintings are hung in a brick pattern, suggesting a blown-up field of irregular Ben-Day dots. Like a vast population, together they create a paean to human struggle, acceptance, and individuality.

 

Current Exhibition

  • Urs Fischer

Urs Fischer: ERROR

Greenwich May 13th to October 1st, 2019

Book a Tour
  • Installation view
  • Installation view
  • Urs Fischer: Error
Installation view

Untitled (Bread House) (2004-2005) is a life-size cabin built from loaves of bread, expandable foam, and wood. The quaint alpine structure is set on an arrangement of Oriental carpets. Over time the house decays, shedding crumbs on the floor and emitting a distinct, pervasive odor.

The bed sculptures Kratz and Untitled (Soft Bed), (both 2013) signal an alternate surrealist world and appear to buckle under the pressure of some invisible force. Kratz, cast in aluminum but disguised in a layer of mimetic paint, is made even more credible by the pile of real concrete that has been poured on top of it, as if to hasten its collapse.

In Horse/Bed (2013), a horse has fully merged with a hospital bed, whose various parts envelop the animal’s head and legs. The horse stands upright, “wearing” the bed like a harness as though nothing is amiss. Digitally combined from 3-D scans of a taxidermy workhorse and a hospital bed, then milled from aluminum, the detail of the sculpture’s impressive materiality provides an overwhelming amount of information to the naked eye.

The monumental Problem Paintings, making use of headshots as backgrounds, colored and enlarged, then obstructed by silkscreened still life images of fruits and vegetables, propose a clash of representational systems that is both convulsive and darkly humorous.

In the series of Phantom Paintings: Aluminum (2015), Silicone (2015), Barium (2016), Chlorine (2015), Lead & Tin (2016), and Drained (2016), the background of each painting is a photographic image of Fischer’s own face or collaged elements thereof, overlaid with silkscreened marks that are based on real painted or drawn gestural compositions. Like the Problem Paintings, these layered images provide a fresh and subversive view through the clash of representational systems and different cosmic orders.

In the library there are four new paintings created digitally on an iPad, representing imaginary environments, artworks in domestic settings, and surreal compositions. On a screen, as opposed to paper or canvas, Fischer is able to paint with light itself—moving illuminated pixels, reflecting on the subtle atmospheric changes across day, night, and seasons.

Urs Fischer: Error is on view through September 2o19.

Urs Fischer: ERROR Exhibition Opening

The Brant Foundation Library: Urs Fischer

Yoga at The Brant Foundation